Monday, May 21, 2007

Nevada Humane Society states....

Keeping Your Dog Confined to Your Property

...We don't recommend that you chain or tie your dog up to prevent him from wandering off. A chained or tied up dog is likely to become frustrated, which could lead to destructive and/or aggressive behavior. He could also become entangled in his chain, rope or leash and, as a result, severely injure himself....

The Canine Escape Artist

Escaping is a serious problem for both you and your dog, as it could have tragic consequences. If your dog is running loose, he is in danger of being hit by a car, being injured in a fight with another dog, or being hurt in a number of other ways. Additionally, you're liable for any damage or injury your dog may cause and you may be required to pay a fine if he's picked up by an animal control agency. In order to resolve an escaping problem, you must determine not only how your dog is getting out, but also why he is escaping.
Why Dogs Escape

Social Isolation/Frustration

Your dog may be escaping because he's bored and lonely if:

* He is left alone for long periods of time without opportunities for interaction with you.
* His environment is relatively barren, without playmates or toys.
* He is a puppy or adolescent (under three years old) and doesn't have other outlets for his energy.
* He is a particularly active type of dog (like the herding or sporting breeds) who needs an active job in order to be happy.
* The place he goes to when he escapes provides him with interaction and fun things to do. For example, he goes to play with a neighbor's dog or to the local school yard to play with the children.
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... Sexual Roaming

Dogs become sexually mature at around six months of age. An intact male dog is motivated by a strong, natural drive to seek out female dogs. It can be very difficult to prevent an intact dog from escaping, because his motivation to do so is very high.
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... Separation Anxiety

Your dog may be escaping due to separation anxiety if:

* He escapes as soon as, or shortly after, you leave.
* He displays other behaviors that reflect a strong attachment to you, such as following you around, frantic greetings or reacting anxiously to your preparations to leave.
* He remains near your home after he's escaped.

Factors that can precipitate a separation anxiety problem

* There has recently been a change in your family's schedule that has resulted in your dog being left alone more often.
* Your family has recently moved to a new house.
* There's been a death or loss of a family member or another family pet.
* Your dog has recently spent time at an animal shelter or boarding kennel.
...

...How Dogs Escape

Some dogs jump fences, but most actually climb them, using some part of the fence to push off from. A dog may also dig under the fence, chew through the fence, learn to open a gate or use any combination of these methods to get out of the yard. Knowing how your dog gets out will help you to modify your yard. However, until you know why your dog wants to escape, and you can decrease his motivation for doing so, you won't be able to successfully resolve the problem.
Recommendations for Preventing Escape
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"Bark! Bark! Bark!"

Some canine behavior problems, such as house soiling, affect only a dog's owners. However, problems such as escaping and excessive barking can result in neighborhood disputes and violations of animal control ordinances. Therefore, barking dogs can become "people problems." If your dog's barking has created neighborhood tension, it might be a good idea to discuss the problem with your neighbors. It's perfectly normal and reasonable for dogs to bark from time to time, just as children make noise when they play outside. However, continual barking for long periods of time is a sign that your dog has a problem that needs to be addressed...

Social Isolation/Frustration/Attention-Seeking

Your dog may be barking because he's bored and lonely if:

* He's left alone for long periods of time without opportunities for interaction with you.
* His environment is relatively barren, without playmates or toys.
* He's a puppy or adolescent (under three years old) and doesn't have other outlets for his energy.
* He's a particularly active type of dog (like the herding or sporting breeds) who needs a "job" to be happy.
...


Part of me wants to print this whole blog out and leave it in Crazy Lady's mailbox.

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